een talks formula one
9. Chris Amon
The best driver to never win a Grand Prix, Chris Amon should have been World Champion at least once in 1968, according to Forghieri. He blamed himself for creating a car that was quick but unreliable and not up to the scratch of the talent of Amon.
He left Ferrari part way through 69 after even more retirements, and joined March in 1970 where he was met with even more retirement. He continued to gather points and podiums and in 1972 he started on pole and set the fastest lap at the French Grand Prix, only to finish third.
He won two non-championship races, though. The 1970 BRDC International Trophy and the 1971 Argentinian Grand Prix.
He did enjoy success outside of Formula One, with multiple victories in the Formula Tasman series, and a clutch of endurance race victories including at Le Mans in 1966.
Just to highlight Amon’s poor luck, Mario Andretti once said of him: “If he became an undertaker, people would stop dying.”

9. Chris Amon

The best driver to never win a Grand Prix, Chris Amon should have been World Champion at least once in 1968, according to Forghieri. He blamed himself for creating a car that was quick but unreliable and not up to the scratch of the talent of Amon.

He left Ferrari part way through 69 after even more retirements, and joined March in 1970 where he was met with even more retirement. He continued to gather points and podiums and in 1972 he started on pole and set the fastest lap at the French Grand Prix, only to finish third.

He won two non-championship races, though. The 1970 BRDC International Trophy and the 1971 Argentinian Grand Prix.

He did enjoy success outside of Formula One, with multiple victories in the Formula Tasman series, and a clutch of endurance race victories including at Le Mans in 1966.

Just to highlight Amon’s poor luck, Mario Andretti once said of him: “If he became an undertaker, people would stop dying.”

The March “pits”, 1970 French Grand Prix.

The March “pits”, 1970 French Grand Prix.

Nice sideburns, Max.

Nice sideburns, Max.

Start up procedure for the Adrian Newey designed 1990 Leyton House CG901B.

TY to Planet-F1 forums for this find.

Brazilian Grand Prix, 1989

In his home grand prix, and first grand prix as world champion, everyone expected Ayrton Senna to cake walk home from pole position. Things went awry and he was unable to do this, and even team-mate Alain Prost failed to make chances to pay and only managed a second.

Nigel Mansell, in his debut for the Scuderia, managed a superb victory. Before the race, the British-Manx driver remained doubtful he would even finish, such was the untested nature of the new Ferrari V12 - making it debut for the first time since the debut of the Flat-12 in the 312B in 1970, later replaced by the V6 turbo in the mid 80’s.

Nigel would only go on to win one more race that season, another superb victory at Hungary where he out wiled Ayrton Senna as they were making their way past back-markers. The Ferrari remained very unreliable, It took 10 grand prixs (excluding the San Marino Grand Prix he didn’t enter) for Mansell’s team mate Berger to score any points, and Mansell’s debut win was followed by 5 straight retirements. Ferrari only managed third, behind McLaren-Honda and Williams-Renault in the Constructors Championship.

Another interesting fact is that Gugelmin, the Brazilian on the third step of the podium, managed his performance in the Adrian Newey designed March-Judd. Famously becoming the only non-turbo car to lead a race in 1988, Newey produced aerodynamically radical and advanced cars that all other teams would go on to copy. By the end of 1990, March (now called Leyton House) bizarrely fired their rising star, blaming poor performance on him. Frank Williams and Patrick Head instantly recognised his talent and signed him to help design what would go on to become one of the most dominant Formula One cars of all time. The rest, I guess you could say, is history.