een talks formula one
Scuderia Ferrari at Detroit, 1984.

Scuderia Ferrari at Detroit, 1984.

Jesus H, this is one of the best F1 photos I’ve ever seen. Dale Kristemaker never ceases to amaze me with the quality of the photos he has taken over the years.
Also, you know when you’re a F1 geek when you have favourite F1 photographers. Get on my level. (The Cahiers still win though, sorry Dale)
Anyway, Michele Alboreto for the Scuderia, 1985 Austrian Grand Prix.

Jesus H, this is one of the best F1 photos I’ve ever seen. Dale Kristemaker never ceases to amaze me with the quality of the photos he has taken over the years.

Also, you know when you’re a F1 geek when you have favourite F1 photographers. Get on my level. (The Cahiers still win though, sorry Dale)

Anyway, Michele Alboreto for the Scuderia, 1985 Austrian Grand Prix.

Rene Arnoux’s Helmet, 1983 US GP West at Long Beach. He raced for the Scuderia that year, taking place of seriously injured country man Dider Pironi. Rene made a lunge at the title but was tipped in the end by Brazilian hot-shot Nelson Piquet.

Rene Arnoux’s Helmet, 1983 US GP West at Long Beach. He raced for the Scuderia that year, taking place of seriously injured country man Dider Pironi. Rene made a lunge at the title but was tipped in the end by Brazilian hot-shot Nelson Piquet.

itsawheelthing:

it’s hard to imagine a classic rear-engined Ferrari F1 not to have either a V or flat 12 in the back, but it wasn’t until the ‘64 season that they started their mighty 12 cilinder tradition, up until then they had used an array of different V6 & V8 set ups … like this V8 laying in Lorenzo Bandini’s 158, used in the 1964 Dutch Grand Prix at Zandvoort
picture taken by the great Paul-Henri Cahier

Ferrari used V12 prior to 1954, but it wasn’t until 1965 that Formula One engine regulations allowed larger engines, bumping up from the 1.5 litres that had existed from 1960 to 3.0 litres which lasted until 1987 when 3.5 litres engines were allowed to counter the vastly superior 1.5 litre turbos. After the succession of disastrous crashed in 1994 that lead to severe injuries to Alesi and Wendlinger and the deaths of Senna and Ratzenberger, engine capacity was bumped down to 3.0 litres once more, with Ferrari abandoning the legendary V12 in 1996. Engine capacity dropped once more to 2.4 litres in 2006, and in 2014 they are set to take another dive to 1.6 litres, albeit with severely restricted turbos.
Oh, and if you haven’t ever looked up any Cahier photos before, you should definitely take a look. Many of my favourite Formula One photos were taken by Cahier and his father.

itsawheelthing:

it’s hard to imagine a classic rear-engined Ferrari F1 not to have either a V or flat 12 in the back, but it wasn’t until the ‘64 season that they started their mighty 12 cilinder tradition, up until then they had used an array of different V6 & V8 set ups … like this V8 laying in Lorenzo Bandini’s 158, used in the 1964 Dutch Grand Prix at Zandvoort

picture taken by the great Paul-Henri Cahier

Ferrari used V12 prior to 1954, but it wasn’t until 1965 that Formula One engine regulations allowed larger engines, bumping up from the 1.5 litres that had existed from 1960 to 3.0 litres which lasted until 1987 when 3.5 litres engines were allowed to counter the vastly superior 1.5 litre turbos. After the succession of disastrous crashed in 1994 that lead to severe injuries to Alesi and Wendlinger and the deaths of Senna and Ratzenberger, engine capacity was bumped down to 3.0 litres once more, with Ferrari abandoning the legendary V12 in 1996. Engine capacity dropped once more to 2.4 litres in 2006, and in 2014 they are set to take another dive to 1.6 litres, albeit with severely restricted turbos.

Oh, and if you haven’t ever looked up any Cahier photos before, you should definitely take a look. Many of my favourite Formula One photos were taken by Cahier and his father.

hellformotors:

Willy Mairesse Ferrari 156

Hands down one of the prettiest cars ever made.

hellformotors:

Willy Mairesse Ferrari 156

Hands down one of the prettiest cars ever made.

born-survivor:

Following his first win of the season, Fernando Alonso’s message is clear as he points to the Prancing Horse on his steering wheel: Ferrari are back. He and the team will now be hoping their victory will prompt the sort of impressive second half to a season that they enjoyed in 2010 : Silverstone Sunday 10th July 2011

born-survivor:

Following his first win of the season, Fernando Alonso’s message is clear as he points to the Prancing Horse on his steering wheel: Ferrari are back. He and the team will now be hoping their victory will prompt the sort of impressive second half to a season that they enjoyed in 2010 : Silverstone Sunday 10th July 2011

timewastingmachine:



Gilles Villeneuve | Ferrari 126CK



And this angle really encapsulates how pretty the wing-car era was.

timewastingmachine:

Gilles Villeneuve | Ferrari 126CK

And this angle really encapsulates how pretty the wing-car era was.

timewastingmachine:


Gilles Villeneuve | Ferrari 126C


This angle really encapsulates how ugly the wing-car era of Formula One really was.

timewastingmachine:

Gilles Villeneuve | Ferrari 126C

This angle really encapsulates how ugly the wing-car era of Formula One really was.

Mark Webber’s pass on Alonso through Eau Rouge was an example of when a grand prix driver has really come of age, racing against another grand prix driver that he has sufficient confidence in. And Alonso would have to be given the credit for being someone that Mark Webber had such trust and confidence in - because trust and confidence is not always the same thing - to be able to execute that manoeuvre, and it was the manoeuvre of the year for me.
Sir Jackie Stewart (via appleseed08)

torquef1:

My Scuderia Ferrari 1998 autograph collection, feat:

  • Personal letter from Ross Brawn
  • Autograph from Jean Todt
  • SF98 postcards
  • Personally signed photograph from Michael Schumcher and Eddie Irvine

Yeah, “jealous” doesn’t even begin to start to explain how I feel.