een talks formula one

Oct 21

itsawheelthing:

reblog week … stealing with your eyesMichael Schumacher, Camel Benetton-Ford B193, 1993 British Grand Prix, Silverstonewatch Senna’s qualifying lap that Schumacher is watching here, commentated by Jackie Stewart

reblogged by itswheelthing. what an honour.

itsawheelthing:

reblog week … stealing with your eyes

Michael Schumacher, Camel Benetton-Ford B193, 1993 British Grand Prix, Silverstone

watch Senna’s qualifying lap that Schumacher is watching here, commentated by Jackie Stewart

reblogged by itswheelthing. what an honour.

(Source: amjayes)

bradleyjardine:

sebsonandfriends:

zombiekakashi:

satanslifecoach:

Kamui Kobayashi - 10"My first choice was number 4, but 10 was the number i had when i made my F1 debut with Toyota"
Marcus Ericsson - 9"It’s simple, i like this number"
Sebastian Vettel - 1Michael Schumacher and Nigel Mansell were champions with number 5, but i choose it because i carried it successfully with karts, and when i won my first F1 title in 2010. But as reigning champion i will have to settle with #1
Daniel Ricciardo - 3It was my first number in karting and i am also a big fan of Nascar legend, Dale Earnhardt
Nico Rosberg - 6My father won the title with number 6
Max Chilton - 4M4X!
Kimi Raikkonen - 7There’s no particular story linked to it, it’s the number i had last year and i saw no reason to change it. I like it, which is good enough, isn’t it?
Romain Grosjean - 8My wife was born on 8 December, we started dating in 2008 and my son is the 8th wonder of the world
Sergio Perez - 11Ever since i was a kid, i always wore the 11 in karting. Actually my email has 11 in it as well. A lot of things have to do with 11, so i identified myself with that number.
Pastor Maldonado - 13i like number 13, everybody was surprised by that, because nobody used it before. In Venezuela, it’s not an unlucky number.
Fernando Alonso - 14It has been my lucky number since 1996. I was 14 on 14 July, driving kart number 14 - and i won the world championship. 
Felipe Massa - 19It was my number in karting and my uncle also used 19 when he raced
Kevin Magnussen - 20It was the same number i had last year when i won the World series by Renault title. I also had it when i won in karting too..
Jules Bianchi - 17I previously applied for 7,27,77 and didn’t get any of them. So was left with 17. 
Esteban Gutierrez - 21It has always been my fav number. It was also the age i started with F1. 
Jenson Button - 22It was the number i raced with at Brawn when i won the 2009 World Championship. 
Jean-Eric Vergne - 25I was born on 25 April. 
Daniil Kvyat - 26..and i was born on 26 April.
Nico Hulkenberg - 27So many asking why 27, it’s simple, it’s my birthday dates 19+8=27
Lewis Hamilton - 44When i started racing, my first kart had 44 on its plate. I won my first British championship with it. Fingers crossed it will bring as much luck now as it did back then
Valtteri Bottas - 77I like the twitter hastag #BO77AS
Adrian Sutil - 99The highest number that you could pick was 99, and in my life i always go for the maximum

I swear Dany and JEV win for the stories.

Poor Jules! I wonder how the decided priority?

I think the order was based off points standing so sadly Jules was near the bottom…

Romain Grosjean’s story omg ;_; thats adorable

bradleyjardine:

sebsonandfriends:

zombiekakashi:

satanslifecoach:

Kamui Kobayashi - 10
"My first choice was number 4, but 10 was the number i had when i made my F1 debut with Toyota"

Marcus Ericsson - 9
"It’s simple, i like this number"

Sebastian Vettel - 1
Michael Schumacher and Nigel Mansell were champions with number 5, but i choose it because i carried it successfully with karts, and when i won my first F1 title in 2010. But as reigning champion i will have to settle with #1

Daniel Ricciardo - 3
It was my first number in karting and i am also a big fan of Nascar legend, Dale Earnhardt

Nico Rosberg - 6
My father won the title with number 6

Max Chilton - 4
M4X!

Kimi Raikkonen - 7
There’s no particular story linked to it, it’s the number i had last year and i saw no reason to change it. I like it, which is good enough, isn’t it?

Romain Grosjean - 8
My wife was born on 8 December, we started dating in 2008 and my son is the 8th wonder of the world

Sergio Perez - 11
Ever since i was a kid, i always wore the 11 in karting. Actually my email has 11 in it as well. A lot of things have to do with 11, so i identified myself with that number.

Pastor Maldonado - 13
i like number 13, everybody was surprised by that, because nobody used it before. In Venezuela, it’s not an unlucky number.

Fernando Alonso - 14
It has been my lucky number since 1996. I was 14 on 14 July, driving kart number 14 - and i won the world championship. 

Felipe Massa - 19
It was my number in karting and my uncle also used 19 when he raced

Kevin Magnussen - 20
It was the same number i had last year when i won the World series by Renault title. I also had it when i won in karting too..

Jules Bianchi - 17
I previously applied for 7,27,77 and didn’t get any of them. So was left with 17. 

Esteban Gutierrez - 21
It has always been my fav number. It was also the age i started with F1. 

Jenson Button - 22
It was the number i raced with at Brawn when i won the 2009 World Championship. 

Jean-Eric Vergne - 25
I was born on 25 April. 

Daniil Kvyat - 26
..and i was born on 26 April.

Nico Hulkenberg - 27
So many asking why 27, it’s simple, it’s my birthday dates 19+8=27

Lewis Hamilton - 44
When i started racing, my first kart had 44 on its plate. I won my first British championship with it. Fingers crossed it will bring as much luck now as it did back then

Valtteri Bottas - 77
I like the twitter hastag #BO77AS

Adrian Sutil - 99
The highest number that you could pick was 99, and in my life i always go for the maximum

I swear Dany and JEV win for the stories.

Poor Jules! I wonder how the decided priority?

I think the order was based off points standing so sadly Jules was near the bottom…

Romain Grosjean’s story omg ;_; thats adorable

itsawheelthing:

reblog week … ready to raceGabriele Tarquini, Lapidus AGS-Ford JH24, 1990 Monaco Grand Prix

itsawheelthing:

reblog week … ready to race

Gabriele Tarquini, Lapidus AGS-Ford JH24, 1990 Monaco Grand Prix

(Source: reincarnating)

Oct 12

rarararaikkonen:

Oh yeah I heard last week on commentary

"kvyat’s been given the red bull seat, he’s not even won a race"

Were they fucking serious he’s not even completed a season and STR is always shite tbh so what can be expected of him

Sebastian Vettel set a very high standard for future Toro Rosso drivers. A lot of Toro Rosso drivers haven’t met that standard, I think Daniel Ricciardo has reached the standard though and we’ll see next year whether Daniil Kyvat will as well. But to judge a driver’s quality on how they do in a poor car is… the mark of a good driver, really. But you gotta have some perspective. Alonso was praised for his performances at Minardi and never got a single point.

Oct 09

F310, “the whale”

F310, “the whale”

(Source: amjayes)

[video]

amjayes:

“This [new] generation of F1 drivers is not used to seeing big accidents. Bianchi’s accident makes me very angry, because I have the feeling of being back in the 80s when this type of accident happened every two or three races. This brings me back very bad memories” - Alain Prost

People criticised Prost for not wanting to race in the rain-soaked 1989 Australian Grand Prix. Apart from the fact he had nothing to race for, having already clinched the championship, he thought the conditions were far too dangerous. He had good reasons. In 1982 during a torrential qualifying sessions at Hockenheim, Prost was involved in an accident that ended the career of Didier Pironi. Pironi, unable to see Prost’s Renault through all the spray, ran into the rear of the slow moving Renault and was launched into the air (in a similar way to Webber’s accident at Valencia not long ago). Didier’s legs were destroyed, was lucky for them not to have been amputated, and never raced again. The accident was also very similar to the crash that killed Didier’s team mate, Gilles Villeneuve, earlier in the season. In a complete contrast to the FIA’s and FOM’s practice of suppressing any footage of Bianchi’s crash, the accident and post-accident attempts to revive Gilles’ were televised world wide in news reports.
In the 1980’s drivers wanted to race in poor conditions because they were so accustomed to such awful crashes that the weather was rarely the key event in a driver’s death or severe injuring. In the 00’s, drivers want to race in poor conditions because of the perceived invincibility of modern technology. Robert Kubica survived his horror crash at Montreal, even Massa survived his freak accident at Hungary that left his life in the balance.
In the early 90’s, there were comments that the large length of time since a death in Formula One despite all the major accidents (think Nige’s fractured spine, Berger’s and Piquet’s severe accidents at Tumberello, Donnelly’s massive accident he some how survived at Jerez) had made driver’s, specifically the younger ones, start to feel invincible. It took Imola in 1994 to throw that out the window and cause a serious rethink of safety in Formula One. If anything good can come out of Bianchi’s crash, hopefully it is a renewed investigation into the safety of Formula One.
To quote Michael Schumacher:

I hope we learn from this. I think there is a lot to learn from and we have to use this. And things like this, they shouldn’t happen without taking the experience from it.

amjayes:

“This [new] generation of F1 drivers is not used to seeing big accidents. Bianchi’s accident makes me very angry, because I have the feeling of being back in the 80s when this type of accident happened every two or three races. This brings me back very bad memories” - Alain Prost

People criticised Prost for not wanting to race in the rain-soaked 1989 Australian Grand Prix. Apart from the fact he had nothing to race for, having already clinched the championship, he thought the conditions were far too dangerous. He had good reasons. In 1982 during a torrential qualifying sessions at Hockenheim, Prost was involved in an accident that ended the career of Didier Pironi. Pironi, unable to see Prost’s Renault through all the spray, ran into the rear of the slow moving Renault and was launched into the air (in a similar way to Webber’s accident at Valencia not long ago). Didier’s legs were destroyed, was lucky for them not to have been amputated, and never raced again. The accident was also very similar to the crash that killed Didier’s team mate, Gilles Villeneuve, earlier in the season. In a complete contrast to the FIA’s and FOM’s practice of suppressing any footage of Bianchi’s crash, the accident and post-accident attempts to revive Gilles’ were televised world wide in news reports.

In the 1980’s drivers wanted to race in poor conditions because they were so accustomed to such awful crashes that the weather was rarely the key event in a driver’s death or severe injuring. In the 00’s, drivers want to race in poor conditions because of the perceived invincibility of modern technology. Robert Kubica survived his horror crash at Montreal, even Massa survived his freak accident at Hungary that left his life in the balance.

In the early 90’s, there were comments that the large length of time since a death in Formula One despite all the major accidents (think Nige’s fractured spine, Berger’s and Piquet’s severe accidents at Tumberello, Donnelly’s massive accident he some how survived at Jerez) had made driver’s, specifically the younger ones, start to feel invincible. It took Imola in 1994 to throw that out the window and cause a serious rethink of safety in Formula One. If anything good can come out of Bianchi’s crash, hopefully it is a renewed investigation into the safety of Formula One.

To quote Michael Schumacher:

I hope we learn from this. I think there is a lot to learn from and we have to use this. And things like this, they shouldn’t happen without taking the experience from it.

Oct 08

itsawheelthing:

addio Andrea …Andrea de Cesaris, LOTO Ligier-Renault JS23, 1984 French Grand Prix, Paul Ricard

itsawheelthing:

addio Andrea …

Andrea de Cesaris, LOTO Ligier-Renault JS23, 1984 French Grand Prix, Paul Ricard

Oct 06

Adios Andrea

Adios Andrea

Adios Andrea

Adios Andrea