een talks formula one

rarararaikkonen:

Oh yeah I heard last week on commentary

"kvyat’s been given the red bull seat, he’s not even won a race"

Were they fucking serious he’s not even completed a season and STR is always shite tbh so what can be expected of him

Sebastian Vettel set a very high standard for future Toro Rosso drivers. A lot of Toro Rosso drivers haven’t met that standard, I think Daniel Ricciardo has reached the standard though and we’ll see next year whether Daniil Kyvat will as well. But to judge a driver’s quality on how they do in a poor car is… the mark of a good driver, really. But you gotta have some perspective. Alonso was praised for his performances at Minardi and never got a single point.

F310, “the whale”

F310, “the whale”

amjayes:

“This [new] generation of F1 drivers is not used to seeing big accidents. Bianchi’s accident makes me very angry, because I have the feeling of being back in the 80s when this type of accident happened every two or three races. This brings me back very bad memories” - Alain Prost

People criticised Prost for not wanting to race in the rain-soaked 1989 Australian Grand Prix. Apart from the fact he had nothing to race for, having already clinched the championship, he thought the conditions were far too dangerous. He had good reasons. In 1982 during a torrential qualifying sessions at Hockenheim, Prost was involved in an accident that ended the career of Didier Pironi. Pironi, unable to see Prost’s Renault through all the spray, ran into the rear of the slow moving Renault and was launched into the air (in a similar way to Webber’s accident at Valencia not long ago). Didier’s legs were destroyed, was lucky for them not to have been amputated, and never raced again. The accident was also very similar to the crash that killed Didier’s team mate, Gilles Villeneuve, earlier in the season. In a complete contrast to the FIA’s and FOM’s practice of suppressing any footage of Bianchi’s crash, the accident and post-accident attempts to revive Gilles’ were televised world wide in news reports.
In the 1980’s drivers wanted to race in poor conditions because they were so accustomed to such awful crashes that the weather was rarely the key event in a driver’s death or severe injuring. In the 00’s, drivers want to race in poor conditions because of the perceived invincibility of modern technology. Robert Kubica survived his horror crash at Montreal, even Massa survived his freak accident at Hungary that left his life in the balance.
In the early 90’s, there were comments that the large length of time since a death in Formula One despite all the major accidents (think Nige’s fractured spine, Berger’s and Piquet’s severe accidents at Tumberello, Donnelly’s massive accident he some how survived at Jerez) had made driver’s, specifically the younger ones, start to feel invincible. It took Imola in 1994 to throw that out the window and cause a serious rethink of safety in Formula One. If anything good can come out of Bianchi’s crash, hopefully it is a renewed investigation into the safety of Formula One.
To quote Michael Schumacher:

I hope we learn from this. I think there is a lot to learn from and we have to use this. And things like this, they shouldn’t happen without taking the experience from it.

amjayes:

“This [new] generation of F1 drivers is not used to seeing big accidents. Bianchi’s accident makes me very angry, because I have the feeling of being back in the 80s when this type of accident happened every two or three races. This brings me back very bad memories” - Alain Prost

People criticised Prost for not wanting to race in the rain-soaked 1989 Australian Grand Prix. Apart from the fact he had nothing to race for, having already clinched the championship, he thought the conditions were far too dangerous. He had good reasons. In 1982 during a torrential qualifying sessions at Hockenheim, Prost was involved in an accident that ended the career of Didier Pironi. Pironi, unable to see Prost’s Renault through all the spray, ran into the rear of the slow moving Renault and was launched into the air (in a similar way to Webber’s accident at Valencia not long ago). Didier’s legs were destroyed, was lucky for them not to have been amputated, and never raced again. The accident was also very similar to the crash that killed Didier’s team mate, Gilles Villeneuve, earlier in the season. In a complete contrast to the FIA’s and FOM’s practice of suppressing any footage of Bianchi’s crash, the accident and post-accident attempts to revive Gilles’ were televised world wide in news reports.

In the 1980’s drivers wanted to race in poor conditions because they were so accustomed to such awful crashes that the weather was rarely the key event in a driver’s death or severe injuring. In the 00’s, drivers want to race in poor conditions because of the perceived invincibility of modern technology. Robert Kubica survived his horror crash at Montreal, even Massa survived his freak accident at Hungary that left his life in the balance.

In the early 90’s, there were comments that the large length of time since a death in Formula One despite all the major accidents (think Nige’s fractured spine, Berger’s and Piquet’s severe accidents at Tumberello, Donnelly’s massive accident he some how survived at Jerez) had made driver’s, specifically the younger ones, start to feel invincible. It took Imola in 1994 to throw that out the window and cause a serious rethink of safety in Formula One. If anything good can come out of Bianchi’s crash, hopefully it is a renewed investigation into the safety of Formula One.

To quote Michael Schumacher:

I hope we learn from this. I think there is a lot to learn from and we have to use this. And things like this, they shouldn’t happen without taking the experience from it.

itsawheelthing:

addio Andrea …Andrea de Cesaris, LOTO Ligier-Renault JS23, 1984 French Grand Prix, Paul Ricard

itsawheelthing:

addio Andrea …

Andrea de Cesaris, LOTO Ligier-Renault JS23, 1984 French Grand Prix, Paul Ricard

Adios Andrea

Adios Andrea

Adios Andrea

Adios Andrea

lookslikehecansurf:

formulaeen:

lookslikehecansurf:

i understand most of you aren’t fond of racing and don’t know much about it, but right now i wish you all did

Today during the Japanese GP of Formula 1 a french driver, Jules Bianchi got into an accident by crashing into a crane evacuating another car. I hope you all, regardless of your location and level of interest, will show respect and pray for Jules as he is currently in the hospital being operated on a severe head injury.

Now, i want to say something else. This wouldn’t have happened if the race was stopped earlier, when weather conditions got worse. This wouldn’t have happened if the race start was moved to today morning. This wouldn’t have happened if people in charge of racing would care more about the safety of the drivers and less about ratings and money.

i think this has been an example of an unacceptable behaviour, something that we have been seeing in racing for a long, long time already. and i hope that this can be a reminder to everyone connected with racing or any kind of sport competition at all, that people’s lives and people’s heath always stands first, and we never see something like that happen again. #ForzaJules

This was a freak accident. Full precautions were taken. Cranes only come onto the racing area (this case, a gravel trap) under double waved yellows where drivers are to be prepared to come to a complete stop, this happened. A red flag/safety car is not required every time a crane comes into the racing area, only for when the track is obstructed.

Of course this would not have happened if the race was stopped. But the race wasn’t stopped. The emphasis on driver safety of the past 20 years post Senna and Ratzenberger’s deaths is exactly what has saved Bianchi’s life - the design of the car, the improvement in helmet technology.

I have seen much, much worse conditions where the officials have waved play on, and to think that every time there is wet conditions the race must be stopped due to the potential for a freak accident? Come on. This type of incident could have potentially happened without rain.

i didn’t say I think that races should be stopped whenever there’s a crane out. The presence of the crane is not the problem here, I completely agree that it was explained and under the rules. But considering the weather conditions, the possibility of another accident in the same place grows, and which is why there should have been a safety car there after Sutil’s crash. It would have put the risk of someone aquaplanning or speeding in the same place to minimum.

Also, my main point is that the race shouldn’t have taken place that late today at all. It should have been moved to an earlier time when the weather conditions were much safer for driving, and if safety was the main thing that concerned FIA and Whiting, it would have been moved. Most of the drivers thought this was appropriate, and it’s a shame that their opinion wasn’t even considered.

I’m not saying there  the race must be stopped due to the potential for a freak accident every time the track is wet. I’m saying there should be a safety car to prevent them. The SC stayed on track after the second start for a long time, even though it was clear the drivers were ready to actually race. But when there was already an accident, when it’s getting more and more dark and when the rain gets harder again, there SHOULD he a safety car on track. That would be crash prevention, that would be thinking of safety.

feather-the-throttle:

formulaeen:

I’ve seen a photo of Jules in the car post-crash, his helmet was completely intact, no visible sign of damage to it, but the role bar and intake and entire area behind his head was destroyed. His helmet, and all the changes in driver’s position in the chassis post 1994, have saved his life. Lets hope he pules through.

I’ve seen it too but you can’t say for sure that his helmet wasn’t damaged, you can’t see the other side closest to the jcb. From the look of the damage to the car his helmet would have been hit

Not trying to put a downer on things, just keep things factual

Absolutely. Based on the damage to the car it is clear that there was impact to the helmet, but the condition of the helmet is very promising and the fact it is intact is also very good.

danielricciardoftw:

Can’t tell you how much better this makes me feel! Sure he’s not out of danger yet, and we just have to wait, but the fact that he’s breathing on his own now is so good to hear!

Very good sign if true.

danielricciardoftw:

Can’t tell you how much better this makes me feel! Sure he’s not out of danger yet, and we just have to wait, but the fact that he’s breathing on his own now is so good to hear!

Very good sign if true.